"Here is my secret. It is very simple: It is only with the heart that one can see rightly; what is essential is invisible to the eye.."- Antoine de Saint Exupéry

Archive for March 18, 2012

hypnotic love

Shadow by my side always
Nobody
Am I a lunatic?

Sounds of a scintillating music
No flutist
Am I insane?

Hypnotic words on paper
No poet
Am I sleeping?

Vermillion clouds at sunrise
You’ve been in my dream
Am I awake?

Rumpled body, swollen lips
Am I crazy?
Or this is the only sanity?


Video

Morning Passages

morning light
filtered through my soul
surrounded by whispers
waking up from a long frozen sleep

morning shine
color scents bursting, petal eyes exploding
leaf fingers pointing towards the passing sky
passion pulsating in every corner

morning white
wrapping me like a warm embrace
blooming completely
yearning to be

morning bright
flowing over me like a river of peace
dropping into my soul as the
birth of life itself.


Video

Philip Glass – The Kiss

“A kiss
like a fragil glass
kiss my mouth
kiss my lips
Like a fragil glass
kiss me soft
kiss me sweet
kiss me tender
But kiss me…”


Video

English Folk – Greensleeves

“”Greensleeves” is a traditional English folk song and tune, a ground either of the form called a romanesca or of its slight variant, thepassamezzo antico.

There is a persistent belief that Greensleeves was composed by Henry VIII for his lover and future queen consort Anne Boleyn. Boleyn allegedly rejected King Henry’s attempts to seduce her and this rejection may be referred to in the song when the writer’s love “cast me off discourteously”. However, Henry did not compose “Greensleeves”, which is probably Elizabethan in origin and is based on an Italian style of composition that did not reach England until after his death.

One possible interpretation of the lyrics is that Lady Green Sleeves was a promiscuous young woman and perhaps a prostitute. At the time, the word “green” had sexual connotations, most notably in the phrase “a green gown”, a reference to the way that grass stains might be seen on a woman’s dress if she had engaged in sexual intercourse out-of-doors.

An alternative explanation is that Lady Green Sleeves was, through her costume, incorrectly assumed to be immoral. Her “discourteous” rejection of the singer’s advances supports the contention that she is not.

In Nevill Coghill‘s translation of The Canterbury Tales, he explains that “green [for Chaucer’s age] was the colour of lightness in love. This is echoed in ‘Greensleeves is my delight’ and elsewhere.” ”

source- Wikipedia


Shatter me

“All I ever wanted was to reach out and touch another human being not just with my hands but with my heart.”
― Tahereh MafiShatter Me


Loneliness is the human condition

“Loneliness is the human condition. Cultivate it. The way it tunnels into you allows your soul room to grow. Never expect to outgrow loneliness. Never hope to find people who will understand you, someone to fill that space. And intelligent, sensitive person is the exception, the very great exception. If you expect to find people who will understand you, you will grow murderous with disappointment. The best you’ll ever do is to understand yourself, know what it is that you want, and not let the cattle stand in your way.”
― Janet FitchWhite Oleander


Romanian cuisine

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“Romanian cuisine, according to Romanian community opinion on http://mamaliga.net, is a diverse blend of different dishes from several traditions with which it has come into contact, but it also maintains its own character. It has been greatly influenced by Ottoman cuisine while it also includes influences from the cuisines of other neighbours, such asGermansSerbians, and Hungarians.

Quite different types of dishes are sometimes included under a generic term; for example, the category ciorbă includes a wide range of soups with a characteristic sour taste. These may be meat and vegetable soups, tripe and calf foot soups (ciorbă de burtă), or fish soups, all of which are soured by lemon juice, sauerkraut juice, vinegar, or traditionally borş. The category ţuică (plum brandy) is a generic name for a strong alcoholic spirit in Romania, while in other countries, every flavour has a different name.

Romanian recipes bear the same influences as the rest of Romanian culture. The Turks have brought meatballs (perişoare in a meatball soup), from the Greeks there is musaca, from the Austrians there is the şniţel, and the list could continue. The Romanians share many foods with the Balkan area (in which Turkey was the cultural vehicle), with Central Europe (mostly in the form of German-Austrian dishes introduced through Hungary or by the Saxons in Transylvania) and Eastern Europe. Some others are original or can be traced to the Roman or other ancient civilizations. The lack of written sources in Eastern Europe makes impossible to determine today the punctual origin for most of them.

One of the most common meals is the mămăliga, a cornmeal mush, served on its own or as an accompaniment. Pork is the main meat used in Romanian cuisine, but also beef is consumed and a good lamb or fish dish is never to be refused.

Before Christmas, on December 20 (Ignat’s Day or Ignatul in Romanian),a pig is traditionally slaughtered by every rural family.[5] A variety of foods for Christmas prepared from the slaughtered pig consist of the following:

  • Cărnaţi — sausages
  • Caltaboş — sausages made with liver
  • Tobă and piftie — dishes using pig’s feet, head and ears suspended in aspic
  • Tochitură — pan-fried pork served with mămăligă and wine (“so that the pork can swim”).

The Christmas meal is sweetened with the traditional cozonac, a sweet bread with nuts and rahat for dessert.

At Easterlamb is served: the main dishes are roast lamb and drob de miel – a Romanian-style lamb haggis made of minced organs (heart, liver, lungs) wrapped and roasted in a caul. The traditional Easter cake is pască, a pie made of yeast dough with a sweet cottage cheese filling at the center.

Romanian pancakes, called clătită, are thin (like the French crêpe) and can be prepared with savory or sweet fillings: ground meat, white cheese, or jam. Different recipes are prepared depending on the season or the occasion.

Wine is the preferred drink, and Romanian wine has a tradition of over three millennia. Romania is currently the world’s 9th largest wine producer, and recently the export market has started to grow. Romania produces a wide selection of domestic varieties (FeteascăGrasăTamâioasă, and Busuioacă), as well as varieties from across the world (Italian RieslingMerlotSauvignon blanc,Cabernet SauvignonChardonnay, and Muscat Ottonel). Beer is also highly regarded, generally blonde pilsener beer, made with German influences. There are also Romanian breweries with a long tradition.

According to the 2009 data of FAOSTAT, Romania is the world’s second largest plum producer (after the United States), and as much as 75% of Romania’s plum production is processed into the famous ţuică, a plum brandy obtained through one or more distillation steps.”

source – Wikipedia